Quiet Riding

Horses and Riders Working in Harmony


Horses in the Fog

Impulsion

[As additional resources, links to book reviews and book purchasing information can be found beneath the quotations when this information is available.]

"We can exert no direct action on the shoulders, as we can on the mouth and hind quarters. The impulsion to put them in movement is given by the hind quarters, which are put in action by our legs; and the direction is given by the mouth, which receives the indication of the reins."

James Fillis, Breaking and Riding
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"If an animal has not the essential requirement of being always ready to go forward, he is useless, although he may be a perfect picture to look at."

James Fillis, Breaking and Riding
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"When he's learning how to liven up, I leave it up to the horse where he goes, and this is a real important part because what you're after here is for that horse to liven up in his feet. When you've got the life in those feet working for you, it's a lot easier to direct them."

Bill Dorrance and Leslie Desmond, True Horsemanship Through Feel
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"Impulsion refers to the 'thrust' coming from the hindquarters."

Jane Savoie, Cross-Train Your Horse, Simple Dressage for Every Sport
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"...speed and running have nothing to do with impulsion."

Sylvia Loch, The Classical Rider
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"Past and present masters warn that true impulsion will elude the rider who rides with strong or heavy leg aids."

Sylvia Loch, The Classical Rider
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"Superior impulsion is when the horses moves through us with our legs merely defining how he moves."

Sylvia Loch, The Classical Rider
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"True impulsion arises from the initial development of balance."

Dr. Gerd Heuschmann, Balancing Act
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"The better the back biomechanics, the more the activity of the hind leg causes it to swing — and impulsion is the result."

Dr. Gerd Heuschmann, Balancing Act
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"Prolonged suspension emanating from a tight back and a slow hind leg has nothing to do with impulsion!"

Dr. Gerd Heuschmann, Balancing Act
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"For maximum development of impulsion, there must be a like ability to collect."

Dr. Gerd Heuschmann, Balancing Act
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"False impulsion and artificial suspension come from a stiff back, not an active hind leg."

Dr. Gerd Heuschmann, Balancing Act
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"Impulsion is one step farther than going forward willingly. It is going forward with springy steps that push the horse lightly off the ground, making him a pleasure to ride."

Mary Twelveponies, Everyday Training: Backyard Dressage
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"A horse must start to balance (carry himself) in order to start to develop impulsion."

Mary Twelveponies, Everyday Training: Backyard Dressage
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"This is what impulsion is — still going forward willingly and relaxed but springing upward with every stride."

Mary Twelveponies, Everyday Training: Backyard Dressage
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"True impulsion does not come from just a mood or an overabundance of energy, but from a development of physical fitness and willing response to the rider's aids."

Mary Twelveponies, Everyday Training: Backyard Dressage
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"The feel of impulsion is more upwardness without loss of rhythm, relaxation and forwardness."

Mary Twelveponies, Everyday Training: Backyard Dressage
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"Before the horse can start to develop impulsion, he must develop more suppleness and balance."

Mary Twelveponies, Everyday Training: Backyard Dressage
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